Resuscitative Directive (DNR/CPR)

Owner Information and Consent.

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We understand this information will be difficult to process, but it is important to be fully informed of the options available as well as the anticipated results of resuscitative (CPR) measures.

Resuscitative Directive (DNR/CPR)

Owner Information and Consent.

Down-arrow.gif

We understand this information will be difficult to process, but it is important to be fully informed of the options available as well as the anticipated results of resuscitative (CPR) measures.

Owner Information and Consent

Regardless of the condition/health of your pet at the time of initial examination/assessment, there is a risk that your pet may stop breathing (respiratory arrest) or may stop breathing and have no heartbeat (cardiopulmonary arrest). Death will occur in either of these situations unless immediate resuscitation attempts are started. It is best for you to consider this possibility and make decisions before the need arises.

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) is the resuscitation of an animal that has stopped breathing or has stopped breathing and whose heart is not beating. Resuscitation of an animal that has stopped breathing but still has a heartbeat is more likely to be successful than resuscitation of an animal with no breathing and no heartbeat.

DNR means “Do Not Resuscitate”. This is a decision that states that CPR is not to be performed in the event that your pet stops breathing or has no heartbeat. We will not attempt to revive your pet in an event where your pet stops breathing or his/her heart stops beating if you choose DNR. This will result in death.

Owner Information and Consent

Regardless of the condition/health of your pet at the time of initial examination/assessment, there is a risk that your pet may stop breathing (respiratory arrest) or may stop breathing and have no heartbeat (cardiopulmonary arrest). Death will occur in either of these situations unless immediate resuscitation attempts are started. It is best for you to consider this possibility and make decisions before the need arises.

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) is the resuscitation of an animal that has stopped breathing or has stopped breathing and whose heart is not beating. Resuscitation of an animal that has stopped breathing but still has a heartbeat is more likely to be successful than resuscitation of an animal with no breathing and no heartbeat.

DNR means “Do Not Resuscitate”. This is a decision that states that CPR is not to be performed in the event that your pet stops breathing or has no heartbeat. We will not attempt to revive your pet in an event where your pet stops breathing or his/her heart stops beating if you choose DNR. This will result in death.

Slide We’ve got your back Animals that have survived cardiopulmonary arrest and have been successfully resuscitated (CPR) are extremely critical and unstable. The likelihood of re-arrest is high and usually occurs within 4 hours of the initial arrest. This means that there is only about a 20% chance that your pet will stay alive for the first 4 hours after resuscitation. Long term survival is even graver, and may be as low as 1%. If the cardiopulmonary arrest occurred as a result of anesthesia, chances of a better prognosis are increased.

Management of the post-arrest patient requires vigilant monitoring and the technical expertise of dedicated critical care personnel. This care is costly and the outcome is uncertain. Brain damage is common post-arrest and may last for days, weeks, or years. There might also be long term or permanent damage to the respiratory, cardiovascular and renal systems.

We know this is an incredibly hard decision for you to make. We are here to help you come to a decision which is right for you and your pet. A member of our team will be here to answer any questions which arise while you navigate this difficult process.